Question: What If There Was No Treaty Of Waitangi?

Who was affected by the Treaty of Waitangi?

What is the Treaty of Waitangi.

The Treaty of Waitangi was a written agreement made in 1840 between the British Crown (the monarch) and more than 500 Māori chiefs.

After that, New Zealand became a colony of Britain and Māori became British subjects..

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

Is the Treaty of Waitangi important today?

The Treaty of Waitangi is New Zealand’s founding document. The principles of the Treaty are referred to in several Acts of Parliament. It is an important part of the New Zealand education system and how New Zealanders work. Applying the Treaty influences life in New Zealand in many ways.

What were the consequences of the Treaty of Waitangi?

What issues of injustice arose from the Treaty of Waitangi? Land ownership created many problems for race relations. British officials had a very inconsistent approach, which led to uncertainty over policy. For Māori, land was integral to their culture and pre-Treaty land purchases were to be re-examined.

What does the treaty mean today?

The Treaty was a contract of respect between the British and Māori. … The Treaty now means there must be respect between Māori and non-Māori. It is important that the laws and rules today consider and respect both Māori and non-Māori ways of living.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi promise?

The Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 and was an agreement between the British Crown and a large number of Māori chiefs. … The Treaty promised to protect Māori culture and to enable Māori to continue to live in New Zealand as Māori.

Why did some chiefs not sign the Treaty of Waitangi?

Tāraia Ngākuti, a chief of Ngāti Tamaterā in the Coromandel, was one of many notable chiefs who refused to sign the Treaty of Waitangi. … As a result the British Colonial Office ruled that all Māori were British subjects, whether or not they or their chiefs had signed the treaty.

What tribe did not sign the Treaty of Waitangi?

Not All Rangatira Signed the Treaty Not as many Māori signed who lived in areas where there had been few missionaries or none at all. This was the case for the Arawa and Tuwharetoa tribes in the central North Island.

How was the Treaty of Waitangi broken?

It has been estimated that by 1909 at least 18 million acres of it was in individual ownership, almost none of it had been settled by Māori. In the 20th Century there was further loss of Māori land to the Crown through private and Government purchases and under the Public Works Act, that sometimes breached the Treaty.

Is the Treaty of Waitangi fair?

Colonists believed the Treaty of Waitangi was fair because it offered Māori the rights of British citizens. The signing of the Treaty made it easier for settlers to acquire land. … These Pākehā were often key ‘go-betweens’, connecting settlers and Māori.

What was NZ like before the treaty?

The history of Māori migration and settlement in Aotearoa and the stories of Te Ao Māori (The Māori World) have been retained in the oral histories of each iwi (tribe) and hapu (sub-tribe). Histories of the Māori people are told in the creation stories.

Where is the Treaty of Waitangi now?

Archives New ZealandThe document is now held at Archives New Zealand in Wellington. In any case, the version signed at Waitangi and copied to London in 1840 is the official treaty, and legally there is only one treaty.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important in education?

The Treaty of Waitangi principle calls for schools to understand and honour Treaty principles in all actions and decision making. It is about making our country’s bicultural foundations evident in school policies, organisation, physical spaces, whānau and community engagement, and classroom planning and assessment.

What is Waitangi Day and why do we celebrate it?

Waitangi Day (Māori: Te Rā o Waitangi), the national day of New Zealand, marks the anniversary of the initial signing – on 6 February 1840 – of the Treaty of Waitangi, which is regarded as the founding document of the nation.

How much land was confiscated after the New Zealand wars?

More than 1,200,000 hectares (3,000,000 acres) or 4.4 percent of land were confiscated, mainly in Waikato, Taranaki and the Bay of Plenty, but also in South Auckland, Hauraki, Te Urewera, Hawke’s Bay and the East Coast.

Why did they need the Treaty of Waitangi?

The purpose of the Treaty was to enable the British settlers and the Māori people to live together in New Zealand under a common set of laws or agreements. The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English.

What happened after Treaty of Waitangi?

What happened after the Treaty was signed? Shortly after the Treaty was signed, Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson proclaimed British sovereignty over the whole of New Zealand. … Under British law, New Zealand became technically a part of the colony of New South Wales.

What is the importance of a treaty in today’s society?

Treaties form the basis of most parts of modern international law. They serve to satisfy a fundamental need of States to regulate by consent issues of common concern, and thus to bring stability into their mutual relations.