Quick Answer: What Doctor Treats Pigeon Chest?

What is the home remedy for pigeon chest?

One of the ways to treat it is through exercise.

However, exercise might not exactly sound easy since pectus excavatum can cause: trouble breathing.

chest pain….It’ll also work your core and your pecs, especially if you use weights.Sit up straight and engage your core.

Inhale and as you exhale, twist to the right.More items….

Can you fix pigeon chest in adults?

Surgery is usually only an option for people when a chest brace has been ineffective or when they have passed puberty. A doctor may also consider surgery for people whose symptoms are severe.

What does pigeon chest indicate?

Pectus carinatum is commonly known as pigeon chest. It happens when part of your child’s breastbone is pressed outwards or raised up.

Is pectus excavatum genetic?

There is no known cause for pectus excavatum. It can sometimes run in families — which suggests genetics may play a role. Pectus excavatum can also be associated with connective tissue disorders such as Marfan syndrome.

Does pectus Carinatum affect breathing?

For most people, pectus carinatum is an aesthetic issue only. This condition frequently results in an asymmetrical chest. In more severe cases, symptoms may also include difficulty breathing during physical activities, recurring respiratory infections, and asthma.

Who treats pigeon chest?

If your child has mild pectus carinatum, a surgeon may recommend a chest-wall brace. This works similar to orthodontic braces on a child’s teeth. By applying steady pressure over time, the sternum can be gradually reshaped. Patients must wear the brace for 14 to 23 hours a day for several months.

How do you fix pectus Carinatum?

If pectus carinatum is causing symptoms, there are two treatment options: bracing and surgery. Bracing for pectus carinatum works similar to the way braces work on teeth. The brace is worn around the chest and provides pressure from both the front and back to move the breastbone back to its usual position.

Is pectus Carinatum genetic?

The cause of Pectus Carinatum is currently unknown, but the fact that it tends to recur in families suggests that genetics may play a role. Excessive growth and structural abnormalities of cartilage (tough, connective tissue) of the ribs and breastbone are present in pectus carinatum.

Does pigeon chest get worse with age?

Prognosis. Pectus malformations usually become more severe during adolescent growth years and may worsen throughout adult life. The secondary effects, such as scoliosis and cardiovascular and pulmonary conditions, may worsen with advancing age.

How do you know if you have pectus Carinatum?

The main symptom of pectus carinatum is a breastbone that sticks out. Sometimes the deformity isn’t noticeable until after the adolescent growth spurt. Some people will also have shortness of breath, especially during exercise.

How long do you have to wear a pectus Carinatum brace?

Most kids will wear a brace for 6 months to a year, though some will need one for longer. They usually can remove it for sports, showering, and other activities, but usually must wear it for 8 hours a day or longer. Help your child wear the brace exactly as recommended by your health care provider.

How long does it take to fix pectus Carinatum?

How long does it take to correct the deformity? While visible improvements are noticeable within weeks, correction is generally completed within the first 4 to 8 months of treatment wearing the brace 23 hours/day.

Can pectus Carinatum go away?

Pectus carinatum is a long-term condition that will not go away on its own. By itself, pectus carinatum is not dangerous. It does not cause any symptoms other than the abnormal appearance of the chest, and having it will not make you sick or shorten your lifespan.

Can pectus Carinatum cause back pain?

Some patients with pectus excavatum experience chest and back pain that is usually musculoskeletal in origin. The exact cause of the pain is poorly understood. Pectus excavatum and pectus carinatum are frequently associated with scoliosis.