What Are The 3 Articles Of The Treaty Of Waitangi?

Why did the British want to sign the Treaty of Waitangi?

Reasons why chiefs signed the treaty included wanting controls on sales of Māori land to Europeans, and on European settlers.

They also wanted to trade with Europeans, and believed the new relationship with Britain would stop fighting between tribes..

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important today?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected.

What are the main points of the Treaty of Waitangi?

Treaty of WaitangiThe Waitangi Sheet of the Treaty of WaitangiContextTreaty to establish a British Governor of New Zealand, consider Māori ownership of their lands and other properties, and give Māori the rights of British subjects.Signed6 February 18406 more rows

Is the Treaty of Waitangi fair?

Colonists believed the Treaty of Waitangi was fair because it offered Māori the rights of British citizens. The signing of the Treaty made it easier for settlers to acquire land. … Pākehā took sides with Māori and were known as ‘philo-Māori’ or Pākehā–Māori.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi say?

Te Tiriti o Waitangi) is an important agreement that was signed by representatives of the British Crown and Māori in 1840. … The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English.

Which Chiefs did not sign the Treaty of Waitangi?

Tāraia Ngākuti, a chief of Ngāti Tamaterā in the Coromandel, was one of many notable chiefs who refused to sign the Treaty of Waitangi.

Who signed the Treaty of Waitangi first?

Hone Heke6 February 1840 Hone Heke was the first to sign. That day at Waitangi, about 40 rangatira signed the Treaty.

What does Article 3 of the Treaty of Waitangi mean?

Treaty of Waitangi (3) Article 3. This is the arrangement for the consent to the governorship of the Queen. The Queen will protect all the Māori people of New Zealand, and give them all the same rights as those of the people of England.

What were the problems with the Treaty of Waitangi?

The land was lost through a combination of private and Government purchases, outright confiscation, and Native Land Court practices that made it difficult for Māori to maintain their land under traditional ownership structures. There were some purchases of Māori land made before the Treaty was signed.

What is the meaning of Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty of Waitangi is the founding document of our country. Maori agreed: to let other people live in their country; and. to let the British make rules about behaviour and see that everyone obeys them.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi promise?

The Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 and was an agreement between the British Crown and a large number of Māori chiefs. … The Treaty promised to protect Māori culture and to enable Māori to continue to live in New Zealand as Māori.

What is Article 2 of the Treaty of Waitangi?

Article Two Māori agreed to give the Crown a right to deal with them over land transactions. English: confirmed and guaranteed to the chiefs ‘exclusive and undisturbed possession of their lands and estates, forests, fisheries, and other properties’.

How many articles are there in the Treaty of Waitangi?

three articlesThe three articles of the Treaty of Waitangi. The chiefs of the Confederation and all the chiefs who have not joined that Confederation give absolutely to the Queen of England for ever the complete government over their land.

What is taonga mean?

Taonga (taoka in South Island Māori) is a Māori language word which refers to a treasured possession in Māori culture. … Intangible examples may include language and spiritual beliefs.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.